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Michigan Black Bear Hunting

Looking for a different type of hunt? How about a black bear? Michigan is home to more than 14,000 black bears, with 7,140 licenses available for the 2018 season. That means nearly 2 black bears for every license are available. If you’ve always wanted to hunt a bear, now is your chance.

Bountiful Black Bears with Little Competition

Most hunters pursue whitetail deer. In fact, hunting bears likely don’t cross their mind. Black bear season in the state of Michigan takes place in the fall, over the course of three separate seasons occurring between September 10th and October 26th. Dates vary by which bear management unit (BMU’s) you reside in (the state is divided into 10).

When applying for your bear tag, you must choose your season and zone to hunt. Bear tags are available in the form of a lottery system. Hunters receive one point for each year they didn’t receive a tag.

For each of the three bear hunting seasons, different amounts of licenses are available. When you apply, you will be mailed a notification that tells you the number of points you’ve acquired. If your name is drawn in the lottery, you can purchase your bear tag online or at an approved retailer.

When Hunting Bears, Follow the Regulations

Within 72 hours of harvest, the bear head (unfrozen) and pelt, or the entire animal must be brought to a bear registration station (by the licensee that killed the bear) for examination, sealing, and registration. You must provide the identification used to acquire the license. After the pelt is sealed, the DNR reserves the right to collect additional bear parts, such as a tooth, for research or management purposes.

Never bait a bear, especially with chocolate or cocoa. Always stay within the law.

If you’ve applied for a tag in the past with no luck, don’t stop. You can apply for your bear license for the 2019 season starting in May.  Keep checking for updates to the Michigan Black Bear Digest for the latest dates. Best of luck in your pursuits of a Michigan black bear in 2019.

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Black Bear Hunting

Black Bear Hunting

A black bear hunt consists of a late morning breakfast. Then we pack you a lunch and prepare you for the afternoon hunt. You will hunt from 1:00 pm till dark.

Travel to the stands is by truck then a short walk or Atv for the further baits. The baits are situated strategically for best bear attraction, not for ease of getting there. You will have a radio to use for checking in with guide at predetermined times, or when you shoot your bruin. We will give you a more detailed orientation upon arrival as to what to do, listen for, etc when you shoot your bear.

Spring hunts are usually warm but come prepared for cold weather and wet weather. Also it may be a good idea to bring some mosquito net clothing and repellent. The thermacells are very popular and actually work well, most hunters swear by them. Fall hunts can be cool and wet also but less bugs. BUT, we don’t have black flies or no-seeums! 

What to bring

  • Camouflage or hunter green clothing.
  • Blaze orange hat/togue and vest for the fall hunt.
  • Mosquito repellent and/or Mosquito netting jacket, head gear, etc.(ThermaCell’s work great).
  • Safety harness and lanyard (your choice)
  • Firearm and ammunition
  • Waterproof walking boots
  • Good quality Rain gear (water proof!)
  • Knee high rubber boots
  • Light jacket
  • Light footwear for around camp/lodge
  • Insulated jacket
  • Headwear – light
  • Headwear – insulated
  • Gloves – light
  • Gloves or Mitts – insulated
  • Insulated pants or jumpsuit or long underwear
  • Personal effects, such as medication, toiletries, alcohol and tobacco.
  • Cooler (if you wish to take meat/trophy home)
  • Passport is now required
  • Hunter Safety now required
  • Border crossing forms pre filled.(firearms declaration form 1-800-731-4000), information at Canada customs 1-800-461-9999
  • Travel arrangements made
  • Camera

(contact us for specifics on gear required for certain Big Game seasons)

Tent Camp – additional items to bring

  • Warm sleeping bag (if flying let us know and we will provide them)
  • Towels, facecloth, shampoo
  • Extra socks
  • Book to read while relaxing at camp and for rainy days
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries for electronics
  • We always try to return back to the lodge on time, but if bad weather hinders, safe travel we will stay put till it is safe to travel. Also, the area we hunt does not have fast responding emergency services, in fact there is virtually none. So if you require any medication, pack extra in case of delayed departure.

All Big Game hunters are required to sight in their rifles at our range on day of arrival. Allow for arrival in daylight and extra ammunition accordingly.

Bear hunt ends with 139 bears killed, protesters calling for ban

The group of protesters gather to end their protest of the six day bear hunt.

The group of protesters gather to end their protest of the six day bear hunt. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Eleanor Hoffman of Rockaway and Anti Metler of the Animal Protection League of New Jersey close the protest and thank those who attended.

Eleanor Hoffman of Rockaway and Anti Metler of the Animal Protection League of New Jersey close the protest and thank those who attended. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Bear hunt protesters at the end of the day.

Bear hunt protesters at the end of the day. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Protesters gather before breaking up and ending their protest of the bear hunt.

Protesters gather before breaking up and ending their protest of the bear hunt. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Angi Metler, Executive Director of the Animal Protection League of New Jersey is overcome with emotion as she is honored and thanked by her group of anti bear hunt protesters for being instrumental in organizing the protest.

Angi Metler, Executive Director of the Animal Protection League of New Jersey is overcome with emotion as she is honored and thanked by her group of anti bear hunt protesters for being instrumental in organizing the protest. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Tired protesters on the last day of the NJ Bear Hunt.

Tired protesters on the last day of the NJ Bear Hunt. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

One of the signs use by the protesters denouncing Governor Phil Murphy for failing to stop the bear hunt.

One of the signs use by the protesters denouncing Governor Phil Murphy for failing to stop the bear hunt. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Angi Metler, Executive Director of the Animal Protection League of New Jersey is overcome with emotion as she is honored and thanked by her group of anti bear hunt protesters for being instrumental in organizing the protest.

Angi Metler, Executive Director of the Animal Protection League of New Jersey is overcome with emotion as she is honored and thanked by her group of anti bear hunt protesters for being instrumental in organizing the protest. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Law enforcement officers from the NJ State Police and NJ State Park Police protect the entrance to the NJ Fish and game registration station.

Law enforcement officers from the NJ State Police and NJ State Park Police protect the entrance to the NJ Fish and game registration station. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Eleanor Hoffman of Rockaway Twp. thanks protesters for coming out to protest the bear hunt.

Eleanor Hoffman of Rockaway Twp. thanks protesters for coming out to protest the bear hunt. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

NJ State Police tell protesters to not interfere with traffic along the road leading to the NJ Fish and Wildlife registration station.

NJ State Police tell protesters to not interfere with traffic along the road leading to the NJ Fish and Wildlife registration station. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

One of the signs use by the protesters denouncing Governor Phil Murphy for failing to stop the bear hunt.

One of the signs use by the protesters denouncing Governor Phil Murphy for failing to stop the bear hunt. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Protesters place a wreath across the street from a NJ Fish and Wildlife registration station where dead bears are to be brought in by hunters.

Protesters place a wreath across the street from a NJ Fish and Wildlife registration station where dead bears are to be brought in by hunters. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Protesters along the road across the road from the NJ Fish and Wildlife registration station.

Protesters along the road across the road from the NJ Fish and Wildlife registration station. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

Protesters stage across the road from a NJ Fish and Wildlife Station where hunters are to bring their the bears they killed. As of 3pm there where no bears registered at this station.

Protesters stage across the road from a NJ Fish and Wildlife Station where hunters are to bring their the bears they killed. As of 3pm there where no bears registered at this station. Chris Pedota, Chris Pedota/NorthJersey.com

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Mans Best Friend vs. Bears: These are the best bear hunting dog breeds

Mans Best Friend vs. Bears: These are the best bear hunting dog breeds

Hunting bears with dogs is an old, and well established tradition. While modern weapons makes bear hunting somewhat safer than it was back in the days of single shot flintlocks, or spears and rocks, it never hurts to have a large animal at your side when taking on what may be the most fearsome predators on the planet.

However, you aren’t going to take a Chihuahua bear hunting, no matter how funny that might seem. Instead, you want to get a good bear hunting dog breed. But what are those breeds, and what makes them so good for bear hunting? Well, keep reading and see for yourself.

Caucasian Shepherd Dogs

Caucasian Shepard

If there is any animal Russians know and understand, it is bears. So is it any wonder that they came up with a massive bear hunting dog breed? The Caucasian Shepherd Dog is a massive, long haired dog that can easily break the 200 pound mark. Bred to protect sheep flocks and homes from predator attack, and of course to hunt bears, this dog is loveable and bonds well with family, but is an absolute terror when facing down other predators.

As befits a large working dog, the Caucasian Shepherd Dog is docile and friendly with the humans that make up their family. This makes them ideal guard dogs, and valued pets, along with powerful, and effective working and hunting dogs.

Karelian Bear Dogs

While the Caucasian Shepherd Dog can go toe to toe with bears, the Karelian Bear Dog is a different kind of bear hunting dog breed. Bred in Finland and surrounding areas since neolithic times, the Karelian Bear Dog makes up in intelligence what it lacks in size.  Karelian Bear Dogs can be used to herd and harass bear, making them easier targets for hunters. Their speed, aggressive behavior towards bears, and intelligence makes them an ideal adversary against the larger predator.

In Washington State, where hunting bears with dogs is illegal, Karelian Bear Dogs are used as bear deterrents by the Department of Fish and Wildlife. Karelian Bear Dogs are also great all around hunting dogs, making them perhaps the most versatile breed of hunting dog out there. After all, what isn’t there to like about a dog that can chase off or hunt bears, and still serve as an all around companion and universal hunting dog? Plus it isn’t the size of a pony!

Hound Dogs

Plott Hound

These hound dogs are popular in West Virginia for hunting small black bear. In fact when hunting black bear, any well trained hound dog will do the trick. Several hound dogs in a pack are ideal for cornering and well… hounding a bear. When selecting hound dogs for bear hunting you want dogs that are intelligent, fast, and strong. The strength of the pack is what matters when using hound dogs for bear hunting, so you’ll have to invest a lot of time, and possibly money into putting together your bear hunting dog team.

Bear Hunting With Dogs

Traditional bear hunting with dogs is under attack by people who do not understand how bear hunting with dogs works. Typically a pack of dogs will chase and corner or tree a bear, allowing the hunter to harvest the bear. Because bears are clever predators, and often are hard to stalk and corner without the help of dogs, humans have been hunting bear with dogs for probably as long as we’ve had dogs and hunted bear. As you have seen, there are breeds of dogs developed especially for bear hunting, from the  very large, to fast and nimble hounds. In the United States, most bear hunting is done with packs of dogs, leaving massive bear dogs as pets, curios and guard animals.

This also means there is no one ideal breed of dog for bear hunting. In fact many successful hunters use packs of mixed breed hounds. Training is sometimes more important than breed, but you always want to start out with a proven hunting dog breed as a dominant trait in a bear hunting dog.

Conclusion

Bear hunting dog breeds come in all shapes and sizes dictated by culture, history and hunting techniques. Not all states allow bear hunting with dogs, which may actually put some popular bear dogs at eventual risk for loss. However, bear hunting with dogs is still going strong in most of the United States. Bear hunting with dogs is the proven best way to hunt small and often destructive black bears. As bear populations boom in many urban and rural areas, a good bear dog is your best first line of defense against them, even if you don’t hunt. So if you hunt with bears, that’s great. If not, maybe get yourself a couple bear dogs. They make great pets, and will keep bears away from your yard!

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Bears coach not ruling out signing Kareem Hunt | Larry Brown Sports

Bears coach not ruling out signing Kareem Hunt

Chicago Bears head coach Matt Nagy sounds like he’s priming fans for a potential signing of Kareem Hunt.

The Bears coach told the media on Monday that he talked with Hunt recently.

“I talked to Kareem, completely wanting to know how he’s doing,” Nagy said at his season-ending press conference. “We had a good conversation. … The only thing I cared about when I talked to him was literally his personal life, how he’s doing. It was a good conversation. He sounded good. But that’s it. The other stuff, that’s not where it’s at. There’s more to it than the football, so we talked strictly on that.”

Nagy was the offensive coordinator in Kansas City during Hunt’s rookie season. They have a relationship that goes beyond football, which is why their conversation did not focus on that.

Hunt has not played since TMZ Sports published a video on Dec. 1 that showed Hunt getting physical with a woman during an incident at his apartment complex. He was cut by the Chiefs that day and placed on the Commissioner’s Exempt List.

The second-year running back remains on the list as the league decides on his eventual discipline. They will consider three incidents when evaluating his case: Hunt was accused of attacking a man at a club in January; he was accused of punching a man in June; and the incident with the woman.

Nagy says he believes in second chances but not third chances. Maybe if it were just one incident, that would be a second chance situation. But the three accusations seem to indicate a pattern for the running back.

Whatever the case, Bears GM Ryan Pace doesn’t want anyone jumping the gun.

“We’re not even there yet,” Pace said. “I mean, I know what he is as a player obviously from watching. Matt knows more about him as a person. We’re not even close to that point.”