Cadbury White Creme Egg Hunt Is Back And You Could Win £10,000 – LADbible

Creme Eggs need a sealed wrapper because whenever Cadbury introduces a monetary incentive to get people buying them, every single one has its aluminium foil unfolded. Grubby little mitts fondling them before you buy.

And the reason for this foraging is because if you’re lucky enough to find one you could win up to £10,000 ($12,650). Still no excuse for groping them without buying, is it?

There will be 783 white chocolate Creme Eggs hidden in normal wrappers and, according to The Sun, there’s also a Where’s Wally-esque challenge to find them hidden in adverts for other brands.

The hunt will begin on January 14 which hammers home the fact that Christmas is over (even more than going back to work). Yep, that’s right, there’s a new selling frenzy in the shape of Easter.

The hunt for the white chocolate Creme Egg will begin on January 14. Credit: Cadbury's
The hunt for the white chocolate Creme Egg will begin on January 14. Credit: Cadbury’s

Last year the prize money for finding one of the small eggs was up to £2,000 so just imagine the mayhem this year with £10,000 up for grabs.

So, where can we go rummaging?

Asda will be hiding one egg worth £10,000, four worth £1,000, 11 worth £100 and 95 worth £50.

The Co-op has the exact same amount as Asda but they will release seven somewhere in the UK each week.

M&S has one egg worth £10,000, one worth £1,000, one worth £100 and 108 £50 – with seven also being released in mainland UK on a weekly basis.

The eggs will be hidden all across the UK in different shops. Credit: Cadbury's
The eggs will be hidden all across the UK in different shops. Credit: Cadbury’s

Morrisons, Sainsbury’s and Tesco will be following Asda and the Co-op with one egg worth £10,000, four worth £1,000, 11 worth £100 and 95 worth £50.

If you find an egg in an advert and take a picture, you could be in with securing one prize worth £10,000. Then there will be 30,000 vouchers for milk chocolate Creme Eggs, and 1,000 white chocolate Creme Egg prizes.

If you find an egg it’s essential that you keep the wrapper to claim the prize. A single egg costs around 58p, while a five-pack will set you back about £2.85.

So if you have some spare shrapnel in the bottom of your pocket – treat yourself. After all, if you don’t win you’re still getting some chocolate. What’s there to lose?

Featured Image Credit: Cadbury’s

Jungle-Penetrating Lasers Reveal Thousands Of Ancient Mayan Structures

LiDAR technology yielded a remarkable discovery in Guatemala’s forest: ancient cities with more than 60,000 structures. Luke Auld-Thomas and Marcello A. Canuto/Tulane University 

By Madison Dapcevich

Hidden below Guatemala’s lush Petén rainforest lies an ancient city not touched by humans for more than 1,000 years, but in its heyday it was home to millions of Mesoamericans who built a sophisticated, sprawling empire. Now, for the first time, a team of international archaeologists has discovered and mapped tens of thousands of ancient structures using airborne light detection and ranging technology (LiDAR) over 2,100 square kilometers (810 square miles) of the nation’s lowland.

LiDAR was first applied to this area in 2009 and focused on just the immediate surroundings of individual sites. Archaeologists first discovered the vast metropolis in February, National Geographic reported, led by Guatemalan science nonprofit group the PACUNAM Foundation. Publishing their work in Science over six months later, the team confirms the presence of more than 61,000 ancient structures, including houses, large palaces, ceremonial centers, and pyramids.

LiDAR pierces through the thick forest canopy to reveal changes in elevation, allowing the researchers to identify these topographical features as manmade walls, roads, and buildings without ever having to set foot on the ground. With this information, they are able to create three-dimensional maps in a matter of minutes, avoiding years of arduous fieldwork.

“Seen as a whole, terraces and irrigation channels, reservoirs, fortifications, and causeways reveal an astonishing amount of land modification done by the Maya over their entire landscape on a scale previously unimaginable,” explained team member Francisco Estrada-Belli in a statement. 

In all, more than 61,000 ancient structures have been accounted for in the surveyed region, indicating that up to 7 to 11 million people were present at the height of the Late Classic period, 650-800 CE. For scale, New York City has about 8.5 million people. These populations were unevenly distributed with different levels of urbanization and were spread out over more than 1,200 square kilometers (810 square miles). This land was modified in some way for the intensive agricultural production needed to support the massive population for hundreds of years.

“It seems clear now that the ancient Maya transformed their landscape on a grand scale in order to render it more agriculturally productive,” said Maya archaeologist Marcello A. Canuto. “As a result, it seems likely that this region was much more densely populated than what we have traditionally thought.”

The international team also mapped extensive causeways and networks connecting the various urban centers, which they say highlights just how interconnected these different city centers were and how much their inhabitants were willing to invest in defensive systems in the event of warfare.

As with any new discovery, the authors conclude that their findings “generate new questions, refine targets for fieldwork, elicit regional study across continuous landscapes, and advance Maya archaeology into a bold era of research and exploration.”

Representation of the archaeological site of Naachtun, Petén, at twilight. Each ancient structure is marked by a yellow dot. L. Auld-Thomas and M. A. Canut/Science
Editor’s Blog

NORAD’s Santa Tracker Began With A Typo And A Good Sport : NPR

Terri Van Keuren (from left), Rick Shoup and Pamela Farrell, children of Col. Harry Shoup, commander of the Continental Air Defense Command, visited StoryCorps in Castle Rock, Colo., to talk about how their dad helped to create the U.S. military’s Santa Tracker.

StoryCorps


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Terri Van Keuren (from left), Rick Shoup and Pamela Farrell, children of Col. Harry Shoup, commander of the Continental Air Defense Command, visited StoryCorps in Castle Rock, Colo., to talk about how their dad helped to create the U.S. military’s Santa Tracker.

This Christmas Eve people all over the world will log on to the official Santa Tracker to follow his progress through U.S. military radar. This all started in 1955, with a misprint in a Colorado Springs newspaper and a call to Col. Harry Shoup’s secret hotline at the Continental Air Defense Command, now known as NORAD.

Shoup’s children, Terri Van Keuren, 65, Rick Shoup, 59, and Pam Farrell, 70, recently visited StoryCorps to talk about how the tradition began.

The Santa Tracker tradition started with this Sears ad, which instructed children to call Santa on what turned out to be a secret military hotline. Kids today can call 1-877 HI-NORAD (1-877-446-6723) to talk to NORAD staff about Santa’s exact location.

Courtesy of NORAD


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Terri remembers her dad had two phones on his desk, including a red one. “Only a four-star general at the Pentagon and my dad had the number,” she says.

“This was the ’50s, this was the Cold War, and he would have been the first one to know if there was an attack on the United States,” Rick says.

The red phone rang one day in December 1955, and Shoup answered it, Pam says. “And then there was a small voice that just asked, ‘Is this Santa Claus?’ “

His children remember Shoup as straight-laced and disciplined, and he was annoyed and upset by the call and thought it was a joke — but then, Terri says, the little voice started crying.

“And Dad realized that it wasn’t a joke,” her sister says. “So he talked to him, ho-ho-ho’d and asked if he had been a good boy and, ‘May I talk to your mother?’ And the mother got on and said, ‘You haven’t seen the paper yet? There’s a phone number to call Santa. It’s in the Sears ad.’ Dad looked it up, and there it was, his red phone number. And they had children calling one after another, so he put a couple of airmen on the phones to act like Santa Claus.”

“It got to be a big joke at the command center. You know, ‘The old man’s really flipped his lid this time. We’re answering Santa calls,’ ” Terri says.

Col. Harry Shoup came to be known as the “Santa Colonel.” He died in 2009.

Courtesy of NORAD


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Col. Harry Shoup came to be known as the “Santa Colonel.” He died in 2009.

“The airmen had this big glass board with the United States on it and Canada, and when airplanes would come in they would track them,” Pam says.

“And Christmas Eve of 1955, when Dad walked in, there was a drawing of a sleigh with eight reindeer coming over the North Pole,” Rick says.

“Dad said, ‘What is that?’ They say, ‘Colonel, we’re sorry. We were just making a joke. Do you want us to take that down?’ Dad looked at it for a while, and next thing you know, Dad had called the radio station and had said, ‘This is the commander at the Combat Alert Center, and we have an unidentified flying object. Why, it looks like a sleigh.’ Well, the radio stations would call him like every hour and say, ‘Where’s Santa now?’ ” Terri says.

“And later in life he got letters from all over the world, people saying, ‘Thank you, Colonel,’ for having, you know, this sense of humor. And in his 90s, he would carry those letters around with him in a briefcase that had a lock on it like it was top-secret information,” she says. “You know, he was an important guy, but this is the thing he’s known for.”

“Yeah,” Rick says, “it’s probably the thing he was proudest of, too.”

Produced for Morning Edition by Jasmyn Belcher Morris.

StoryCorps is a national nonprofit that gives people the chance to interview friends and loved ones about their lives. These conversations are archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, allowing participants to leave a legacy for future generations. Learn more, including how to interview someone in your life, at StoryCorps.org.

Trump Calls on Sessions to ‘Stop the Rigged Witch Hunt Right Now’

Trump Calls on Sessions to ‘Stop the Rigged Witch Hunt Right Now’

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President Trump has been outspoken about his frustration with the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

WASHINGTON — President Trump called on Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday to end the special counsel investigation, an extraordinary appeal to the nation’s top law enforcement official to end an inquiry directly in to the president.

August 1, 2018

Mr. Trump made the overture in a series of Twitter posts, some of which contained quotations the president attributed to a staunch supporter, the lawyer Alan Dershowitz.

August 1, 2018

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Rod J. Rosenstein, his deputy who oversees the special counsel investigation, at the Justice Department on Monday.CreditWin Mcnamee/Getty Images

Mr. Trump’s blunt direction to Mr. Sessions came on the second day of the trial of Paul Manafort, the president’s former campaign chairman and the first person charged in the special counsel investigation to go to trial. Mr. Manafort is accused of bank and tax crimes.

Mr. Trump also tweeted on Wednesday that Mr. Manafort did not work for his campaign long, a defense he hasused repeatedly to distance himself from his former campaign chairman.

never would have made Mr. Sessions his attorney general if he knew Mr. Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia inquiry.

The special counsel is also looking into some of Mr. Trump’s tweets about Mr. Sessions and the former F.B.I. Director James B. Comey and whether the messages were intended to obstruct justice.

Trump Tells Sessions to ‘Stop This Rigged Witch Hunt Right Now’

Trump Tells Sessions to ‘Stop This Rigged Witch Hunt Right Now’

President Trump made a career of firing people on TV. Now, he is expressing his disappointment with Attorney General Jeff Sessions publicly through tweets, but has not uttered two key words.

WASHINGTON — President Trump called on Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday to end the special counsel investigation, an extraordinary appeal to the nation’s top law enforcement official to halt an inquiry directly into the president.

August 1, 2018

The order immediately raised questions from some lawyers about whether it was an attempt to obstruct justice. The special counsel, appointed last year to oversee the government’s Russia investigation, is already looking into some of the president’s previous Twitter posts and public statements to determine whether they were intended to obstruct the inquiry into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and any ties to the Trump campaign.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers quickly moved to contain the fallout, saying it was not an order to a member of his cabinet, but merely an opinion. An hour and a half after the tweet was posted, Mr. Trump’s lawyers contacted a reporter for The New York Times. In a subsequent telephone conversation, one of his lawyers, Rudolph W. Giuliani, dismissed the obstruction of justice concerns, calling it a “bizarre and novel theory of obstruction by tweet,” adding that it was “idiotic.”

never would have made Mr. Sessions his attorney general if he had known Mr. Sessions would recuse himself from the inquiry.

The Justice Department declined to comment.

The president’s lawyers, Jay A. Sekulow and Mr. Giuliani, said in a telephone interview that Mr. Trump was not ordering the inquiry closed but simply expressing his opinion.

“It’s not a call to action,” Mr. Giuliani said, adding that it was a sentiment that Mr. Trump and his lawyers had previously expressed publicly and that it was a statement protected by the president’s constitutional right to free speech.

“He doesn’t feel that he has to intervene in the process, nor is he intervening,” Mr. Sekulow said.

The president wanted the legal process to play out, his lawyers said. “He’s expressing his opinion, but he’s not talking of his special powers he has” as president, Mr. Giuliani said.

trial of Paul Manafort, the president’s former campaign chairman and the first person charged in the special counsel investigation to go to trial. Mr. Manafort is accused of bank and tax fraud crimes that Mr. Trump has characterized as dated and that have nothing to do with his campaign.

In another Twitter post, Mr. Trump compared Mr. Manafort’s situation to that of the mob boss Al Capone.

“Looking back on history, who was treated worse,” Mr. Trump asked.

Urging Mr. Sessions to end the inquiry was unprecedented and amounted to Mr. Trump asking Mr. Sessions to “subvert the law,” said Matthew S. Axelrod, a longtime prosecutor who served in top roles in the Obama Justice Department.

“What he’s saying here is that there’s no one who ought to be able to investigate his actions and, if necessary, hold him accountable for those actions,” Mr. Axelrod said.

Mr. Mueller and his team are also looking into whether some of Mr. Trump’s tweets about Mr. Sessions and the former F.B.I. director James B. Comey were intended to obstruct the inquiry.

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, Democrat of Vermont, suggested on Wednesday on Twitter that the president’s latest directive to Mr. Sessions was just that.

The president’s lawyers made arguments to the special counsel’s office this year about why the president had done nothing wrong through his tweets and public statements.

“I don’t want to disclose our correspondence, but we maintain the theory of obstruction is bizarre and not supported,” Mr. Sekulow said.

On Capitol Hill, senators were busy trying to complete a batch of spending bills ahead of a weeklong recess, and the president’s appeal to Mr. Sessions was treated as an unwelcome intrusion. Democrats denounced it as a dangerous escalation that could become part of an obstruction of justice case. Republicans wagged their fingers, but conceded that the president’s tweets, in the end, probably should not be given too much weight.

“I continue to think that tweets of that nature are inappropriate and do not serve the president well,” said Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine. “He should stay out of what is an active investigation and refrain from commenting on it.”

Katie Benner and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting.